Print
Print Page
Phone
Contact Youthline about this page

Being safe

Topics in this section:


^

Contraceptive choices

Condoms

What is it?
A thin rubber barrier that’s fits over the erect penis and catches sperm

Chance of getting pregnant
2 – 15% if used correctly

Advantages
*Protects against STIs
*Easy use

Disadvantages
*Some people are allergic to rubber
*Can slip and break

Did you know?
Works best when used with a water-based lubricant


Combined Pill

What is it?
A pill that stops ovaries from releasing an egg each month

Chance of getting pregnant
1 – 4 % if used correctly

Advantages
*Doesn’t interfere with sex
*Makes periods regular, shorter, lighter and less painful

Disadvantages
*Must be prescribed by a doctor
*Have to take it daily, at the same time and never skip a day
*May have side effects

Did you know?
The pill doesn’t protect you from STIs so you need to still use condoms with it unless you know your partner is STI free



Depo provera (injection)

What is it?
An injection that stops the ovaries from releasing an egg each month.

Chance of getting pregnant
Less than 1%

Advantages
*Doesn’t interfere with sex
*One injection lasts 12 weeks
*Usually no periods

Disadvantages
* Must be prescribed by a doctor
*Not ideal if you’re considering becoming pregnant in the very near future
*May have side effects

Did you know?
This is useful for women who can’t use the pill



Diaphragms (Female Condom)

What is it?
A rubber or plastic cap or dome that fits inside the vagina and covers the entrance to the womb.

Chance of getting pregnant
4 – 8% if used correctly

Advantages
*Can be put in before sex
*No serious health risks

Disadvantages
*Someone has to teach you how to insert it
*Spermicide can be messy
*Some people allergic to it

Did you know?
Must be used with spermicide to be effective


L.A.R.C. (The coil and implant)

What is it?
Device inserted by a doctor into the uterus or under the skin of your arm.

Chance of getting pregnant
Less than 1%

Advantages
*1 implant provides protection for  3 – 5 years
*Doesn’t have much impact on fertility

Disadvantages
*Has to be inserted and removed by a doctor
*Can cause irregular periods

Did you know?
Can’t be used if you have a family history of breast cancer

For heaps more information on contraceptive choices, check out The Word at www.theword.org.nz 

^

Help! I had unprotected sex

What do I do?
Take the ‘morning after’ pill which stops the egg from being fertilised by the sperm. This pill must be taken within 72 hours of the unprotected sex.
Act fast!! The sooner you take the pill, the more likely it is to work. Taking it within the first 12 hours following sex has the best chance of the pill working.

Where do I get it?
• Chemist
• Doctor
• Family Planning/sexual health clinic

Are there any risks?
• Some women may feel unwell after taking the morning after pill, such as nausea
• If you think you might be pregnant do a follow up pregnancy test with your doctor or family planning before taking it

What if it’s been longer than 72 hours?
• You can be fitted with a copper IUD within 5 days of unprotected sex. Talk to Family Planning or your doctor about this option.

For more info, check out http://www.familyplanning.org.nz/ 

 

^

Sexually transmitted infections

Myth-busters STI Quiz

 

(INSERT STI quiz here)

 

 

Did you know?

For NZ residents under 22 years old, there is no cost for your visit to the Family Planning clinic. To find your nearest Family Planning clinic, go to their website, at www.familyplanning.org.nz.  

Rate this page

Need to talk to someone?

Kia ora - tamariki ma

Contact us, we are here to help!